Friday, August 11, 2017

Friday' Forgotten Book, August 11, 2017



(from the archives)
Nigel Bird

Stuart Kaminsky: Murder On The Yellow Brick Road

I’ve just come to the end of a rather good book. ‘City Of Dragons’ is set in the 1940s and centres upon the work of private eye Miranda Corbie. She’s a tough, hard-drinking, attractive lady with a history as colourful as a butterfly and she’s a wonderful addition to the world of detective fiction.
The good news for me is that I’ve heard from the author, Kelli Stanley, that Miranda is to make a reappearance or two, which gives me something to look forward to and a couple of easier choices when I’m facing the bookstore shelves at some point in the future.

I love to be able to watch characters as their lives unfold from one book to the next, to see them age alongside the people around them as their worlds change. It’s like forming any relationship – the more time you spend in someone else’s company, the better you get to know them (for better or worse). I’ve spent many happy hours with Maigret, Van Der Valk, Harry Bosch, Matt Scudder, Nick Stefanos, Hap Collins/Leonard Pine, and I’m always delighted to discover someone new and interesting to befriend.

One such character has been Toby Peters. I was surprised recently to see that he wasn’t even in contention on a site looking for a favourite detective – didn’t even make the first hundred. I have no idea why. He’s a fabulous character. Powerful and tough on the exterior, soft yet cynical, clever and determined and with a real code of discretion and loyalty that goes further than any sane person would take it. He’s not a son of Chandler or Hammett, but can’t be much further away than being one of their nephews.

He’s no derivative character, either. There’s a difference between homage and imitation and Kaminsky seems to understand that well.
In ‘Murder On The Yellow Brick Road’ we see Kaminsky (and Peters) at his finest. It’s not the first in the series so things are well developed and it’s not further on in the series when Kaminsky hadn’t quite found the confidence needed to leave out elements of the back-story.

“SOMEBODY HAD MURDERED a Munchkin,” is the opening line. Coming on the back of a wonderful title, I was hooked from that point on.
Toby Peters is called in to investigate. Employed over at Warner Brothers until he broke the arm of a B movie cowboy-actor, his services are enlisted by MGM to keep Judy Garland’s name out of the dirt.
It’s his discretion and his integrity that land him a job; that and an interview with Louis B Mayer. Judy is in a difficult position and it’s not looking good for either the star or the star-machine.
In steps Peters. He defends a Swiss midget seen arguing with his fellow Munchkin and victim on a number of occasions and follows up on leads that take him to interview Clark Gable. Later, while working the case, he bumps into Raymond Chandler who’s hoping to get some tips, meets some rough and dangerous characters and he even gets to see Randolph Hearst.
There’s a reel of film involved, blackmail plots and enough twists and turns to keep you guessing all the way. When the villain of the piece is revealed, you’re only a few steps ahead of the game, which keeps it tense and interesting to the end.

Looking at the cast of characters, it would be easy to dismiss this book as a gimmick. I choose to see it in a different way. Kaminsky is playing to his strengths, marrying together his passion and knowledge of film and fiction to create a tale that is worthy of the best.
By mixing in real characters into his plots he was taking a big chance given that many people have strong feelings about all those involved. I’m no expert, but the way Garland and Gable come across it feels entirely as I might have imagined.

At times, the humour and the theatrical nature of the plot and scenes are used to paper over any cracks and the result is a real gem. It’s not only Peters who we come to love. There are a number of other characters in his life who have been beautifully constructed.
There’s Sheldon Mink, lunatic dentist with whom Peters shares an office. Anyone visiting him for treatment should really be seeing a shrink.
Jeremy Butler is the man who owns the building where Mink and Peters hang out. He’s an ex-wrestler, new-father and ageing poet rolled into one package, as well as being someone that’s useful to have around when the going gets tough.
There’s his landlady, a deaf old bird who seems to have selective hearing and a desire to have her memoirs published.
And there’s his brother, a big wig in the police force. When it comes to sibling rivalry we’re talking Cain and Abel. Unlike Toby, Lieutenant Phil Pevsner hasn’t changed his name to mask his heritage. Phil also happens to have the temper of a Berserker and the strength of a team of oxen and he uses both pretty much every time they have a reunion.
These characters play key roles in this and the following books.
When I came to finish ‘Yellow Brick Road’ I really needed to get straight into another. And another after that. And how’s this for a title of a later book - Mildred Pierced; it takes a hell of a mind to come up with jewels like that on such a regular basis.
Light, intriguing and rooted in the early days of detective fiction, pick up this book and you’re sure to return to mine the rich vein that lays waiting for you.


Sergio Angelini, HARK, Ed McBain
Yvette Banek, BLOOD AND JUDGMENT, Michael Gilbert, DEATH IN FIVE BOXES, Carter Dickson
Les Blatt, SCARWEATHER, Anthony Rolls  
Brian Busby, Edith Percival, May Agnes Fleming
Bill Crider, POTENT STUFF, Al James
Martin Edwards, TRENT'S OWN CASE, E.C. Bentley
Charles Gramlich, DARK HOURS, Sidney Williams
Richard Horton, THE HISTORY OF HENRY ESMOND, William Makepeace Thackeray 
George Kelley, THE VAN RIJIN METHOD, Poul Anderson
Margot Kinberg, MURDER IN THE MARAIS, Cara Black  
B.V. Lawson, DEATH IN THE OLD COUNTRY, Eric Wright 
Evan Lewis, GIRL IN A BIG BRASS BED, Peter Rabe
Steve Lewis, MURDER ON THE MAURETANIA, Conrad Allen
Todd Mason, ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S WITCH'S BREW/WITCHES BREW
J.F. Norris, ANGEL LOVES NOBODY, Richard Miles
Matt Paust, LOVE IN THE RUINS, Walker Percy 
James Reasoner, THE SCARLET KILLER AND OTHER STORIES,  Malcolm Wheeler Nicholson
Gerard Saylor, DEADMAN'S ROAD, Joe R. Lansdale 
Kevin Tipple/Barry Ergang, WHO'S NEXT, George Baxt
TomCat, THE THEFTS OF NICK VELVET, Edward D. Hoch 
TracyK, THE RAINBIRD PATTERN, Victor Canning

11 comments:

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

I am a big fan of Kaminsky's Porfiry Rostnikov and Abe Lieberman series, but I never warmed up to Toby Peters. One was enough for me.

Yvette said...

I love the Toby Peters books - stories and characters that make me laugh our loud. LOVE the Salvador Dali one and the Mae West one and the Eleanor Roosevelt one (Fala gets kidnapped!) and best of all: MILDRED PIERCED!! Love the little old wizened landlady and her memoirs and all Toby's kooky friends. Just fabulous stuff. And you're right, this is not mere imitation, though Kaminsky gets all the sign posts right, he still manages to be refreshingly unique. And lest anyone think these are all about ha-ha and nothing else, there is a downright noir vibe running through these books that won't go away. A thoroughly underrated series.

J F Norris said...

I just posted mine. Please add me to the list, Patti. Thanks.

Angel Loves Nobody by Richard Miles

Todd Mason said...

I'm fighting with Blogspot to get it to load images. Is anyone else having trouble with this this morning/now afternoon? Hence greater than even the usual delay...annoying as hell.

Mathew Paust said...

Yvette's comment sold me on the Toby Peters books.

Mathew Paust said...

Todd, I was unable to load an image on gmail a little while ago. Good thing I wasn't armed or I might have shot my laptop screen out.

Todd Mason said...

Mine finally started working again, but it threw me for a loop longer than it should have. Ah, sweet Blogger...you are so fortunate WordPress annoys almost as much and has a slightly higher learning curve (and fights everyone over passwords even more fiercely). And that Tumblr sucks if you want any sort of feedback visible. But not having my comments might make for a Big Plus.

So, perhaps Google was having fits, Matt. Hope you were able eventually.

Mine is finally Up. Thanks as always, Patti.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Well, my Internet has been going off and on all day. I hope this goes up okay. Thanks, Todd

Barry Ergang said...

Murder On the Yellow Brick Road was the first of Kaminsky's Toby Peters novels I read back in the 1980s, my initial attraction being the inclusion of Raymond Chandler as a cast member. I loved the book and have read many other titles in the series since--a series worth any fan of private eye fiction's time.

Margot Kinberg said...

I like Kaminsky's wit, and that wry look at Hollywood! And thanks for including my post.

Charles Gramlich said...

I remember hearing of this one and thinking it was kind of a gimmick. Not that that is bad